Caesar & Red Snapper get a crafty makeover.

Whether you like your tomato based drinks stiff like a Red Snapper cocktail, or long, like a Caesar, not too many craft cocktail bartenders in Canada are overly enthused to make the Nation’s most popular cocktail for you.

Why?

Maybe it’s the curse of popularity or the laborious steps it can take to season and garnish the drink. We believe it is genuinely that the primary mixer commonly used to make the Caesar is loaded with HFCS (15 grams per serving), MSG, Artificial Color and Sodium.

In fact, a single serving of commercial Mott’s Clamato has 1300 milligrams, almost the entire daily limit of 1500. All of it contained in a plastic bottle.

It would seem that there’s place for a craft alternative in the ever more ingredient conscious marketplace.

Enter Walter Caesar. Craft product with better ingredients, more flavour and all stored in a gorgeous glass bottle.

We hope that this year will be largely defined by the continued improvement in mixers for popular drinks. Walter’s has launched in Toronto and Vancouver, and their expansion into the Alberta market is slated for late March. Caesar’s seem to be the next popular drink that will get a craft facelift. 

So who is/was Walter?

Walter Chell was a Hotel Manager tasked with creating a special drink to celebrate the opening of an Italian restaurant in the Calgary Inn (1969). Taking inspiration from Spaghetti alle Vongole and the existing Red Snapper (Bloody Mary) cocktail created by Fernand Petiot for the St. Regis Hotel in New York (1934). Walter stumbled on a formula that had legs. Serious legs.

For some, there will be a question about the cost of using the more expensive mixer. Aaron Harowitz, one of the Founders of Walter All-Natural Craft Caesar Mix, acknowledges the point, but says that he’d like to see people stop thinking of the Caesar as a drink that comes in a pint glass and one that is a little more sipping sized. We couldn’t agree more.

So here’s our recipe for a Red Snapper:

The iconic Red Snapper Cocktail
The iconic Red Snapper Cocktail

1.5 oz Soyombo Mongolian Vodka or Martin Miller’s Gin
2.5 oz Walter Caesar Mix
.25 oz Fresh Lime or Lemon Juice, to taste
2 drops Bitter Truth Celery Bitters
2 drops Hot Sauce (We still love Tabasco)
3 drops Worcestershire sauce

Combine liquid ingredients in a Boston Shaker. Add ice. Shake hard and strain into a coupé with a fleur de sel rub on one side. This gives the person imbibing the drink the option to choose more or less salt. Garnish is entirely up to your creativity. (For the picture above we used fresh Dill as the garnish)

For those that prefer a longer drink (less boozy) then the move to a Caesar simply requires a bit more Walter Caesar mix, to taste. We suggest serving it in a rocks glass with a side part of fleur de sel. Garnish with either fresh herbs, olives, lime or celery. Walter Caesar have two recipes. One lightly spiced (White Bottle Capped) and a spicier one (Black Bottle Capped) that has grated horseradish.

So how does the Walter Caesar Mix taste? HERE IS OUR FULL REVIEW ON THE PRODUCT ITSELF.
It is an outstanding product. It’s delicious. Thick and fresh tasting. The spicier variation is our favorite with its vibrant horseradish bite.

Canada's Caesar Cocktail gets Crafty
For those about to get a Craft Caesar, we salute you. Photo by Cory Knibutat.
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